Will You #GetThemGrowing for National Children’s Gardening Week?

Will You #GetThemGrowing for National Children’s Gardening Week?

Have you been enjoying Chelsea Flower Show recently? My husband Ryan loves watching it for inspiration. His dreams of having a Chelsea-worthy garden are a loooong way off, but he enjoys it nonetheless. My parents also love gardening, but I have to confess it’s never much interested me. I think it has skipped a generation, however, as Ava and Thea love it, Ava in particular. My parents encourage the girls to help in the garden, and they often end up soaked in water butt water, which they love, of course. A few weeks ago Ava worked with Ryan for hours, so he gave her some pots of her own to plant up. Helping in the gardenThea spent the whole time bouncing on the trampoline, but also wanted her own garden. She mainly just filled it with snails though.

When Dobbies Garden Centre asked us if we’d like help to get the girls more involved with gardening, I thought it was a good opportunity to get Thea more engaged. Their #GetThemGrowing campaign is part of National Children’s Gardening Week (26th May to 3rd June) which encourages parents to get their kids growing and enjoying the outdoors. You can find lots of fun ideas for getting the kids into gardening on the National Children’s Gardening Week website, including a bamboo tipi, and growing an edible hanging basket.

Did you know?

New research from Dobbies* shows that 61% of parents think gardening is a good way for their children to learn more about the natural world while still having fun. An independent survey** by National Children’s Gardening Week showed 94% of primary school head teachers and deputy head teachers agreed school gardening benefits either pupils’ physical health, mental well-being, social skills, behaviour or concentration.

Sadly, primary schools typically have just 33p per pupil to spend on school gardening. We are lucky that we have a garden for the girls to potter about in, and we have grown veggies in the past (the royal ‘We’ – I just cook them!). Thea got a Fairy Garden for her birthday and both girls were so excited when the grass started growing. Ava is also a strawberry picking ninja so we are hoping they will follow in their dad and grandparents’ footsteps and be green fingered.

Thea was super keen to plant up the peas Dobbies sent us, using the cute little child-sized tools. She is also excited about the water bottle as her new topic at school is all about creepy crawlies. The lovely activity book will be great to support this topic too.

Will You #GetThemGrowing for National Children's Gardening Week?

Thea is Excited About #GetThemGrowing

Thea couldn’t wait to get her wellies on and plant the pea seeds in her corner of the garden. She nearly forgot to wear the gloves but remembered just in time!

After all that hard work it was time for  a treat.

Enjoying a treat after all her hard work gardening

Thea is excited to see how her garden is growing and we have everything crossed that they will grow!

How You Can #GetThemGrowing

Dobbies is running a special Little Seedlings Club on Sunday 3rd June, as part of the National Children’s Gardening Week. Kids from 4 to 10 will get to personalise their garden by planting seeds in the shape of their initials, then take them home to watch them grow. The best part is that it’s free: you can sign up and find your local store and event times here. Our family love a trip to the garden centre, so we will hopefully be heading over to our local Dobbies on the 3rd – maybe see you there!

Follow:

*Dobbies National Children’s Gardening Week research conducted on 1019 parents and children aged 7-11 by Independent Media News on behalf of Dobbies Garden Centres.

**Referenced from ‘THE STATE OF PRIMARY SCHOOL GARDENING IN THE UK’ report conducted by National Children’s Gardening Week and the Horticultural Trades Association.

What do you think? You're welcome to comment without your name, email or website if you prefer.

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.